Siem Reap Chronicles: Day 3

I posted our Day 2 adventure on November 9, 2013 and the last leg today. (*゚ー゚)ゞ  Just how lazy is that? Tsk.

I vividly remember it was raining the night before and it has not abated the following day. We were dreading the temple-hopping we’ll be doing because it will surely be muddy and slippery and downright scary given that we’ll be traversing the Indiana Jones temple.

Prasat Beng Mealea

Translated as Lotus Pond Temple and known to tourist as the Indiana Jones temple well because the movie of the same title starring Harrison Ford was shot here.

This Hindu temple is about 800 years old and reminiscent of the sprawling Angkor Wat but in a smaller scale.

Because not even the rain can dampen our good spirits. We got ourselves a US$1 flimsy raincoat that saved us from lugging around a huge umbrella that our tour guide readied on a rainy day like this.

Because not even the rain can dampen our good spirits. We got ourselves a US$1 flimsy raincoat that saved us from lugging around a huge umbrella that our tour guide readied on a rainy day like this.

A few meters of walking along a muddy trail, we arrived at the collapsed entrance of Prasat Beng Mealea.

A few meters of walking along a muddy trail, we arrived at the collapsed entrance of Prasat Beng Mealea.

The wooden floorboards around Prasat Beng Mealea make traversing the ruins suitable for tourists but on a rainy day like this, it can get slippery so just be careful.

The wooden floorboards around Prasat Beng Mealea make traversing the ruins suitable for tourists but on a rainy day like this, it can get slippery so just be careful.

With the rain still pouring, I can hardly make any decent shot without getting rain spatters on my lens.

With the rain still pouring, I can hardly make any decent shot without getting rain spatters on my lens.

For all its seemingly wild outgrowths, Beng Mealea is a quiet temple and well worth the additional US$5 as this is not included in the Angkor pass.

For all its seemingly wild outgrowths, Beng Mealea is a quiet temple and well worth the additional US$5 as this is not included in the Angkor pass.

With the rain still pouring, it was impossible to explore Beng Mealea ala Indiana Jones; it’s too slippery to walk over the ruins so we stayed on the wooden structures. And when we have circled the entire place, we headed to our van to get on our next stop.

The sun seem to have finally talked some sense to the rain since it stopped pouring at last. Halfway to the Rolous Group, I was just so happy to see the fierce afternoon sun from the window.

Siem Reap scenes

Sitting by the window gives you a passing glimpse of the local’s way of life. It was past 12NN so I guess school day is done and it’s time to head home.

I’ve lived a sheltered life and as embarrassing as it may be, I’m putting it out here. ***tada!*** I don’t know how to bike. (-_-) But I’m planning (operative word, planning 😀 ) to get me one with a nifty little basket in front, just like what these kids have.

Rolous Group

The Rolous Group consist of three temples: Lolei, Preah Ko and Bakong. Unfortunately, Lolei Temple was closed when we visited last October 2013 and so we headed instead to Preah Koh.

Preah Koh (Sacred Bull) is a Hindu temple and the first to be built in the ancient city,  Hariharalaya, now known as Rolous.

Preah Koh (Sacred Bull) is a Hindu temple and the first to be built in the ancient city, Hariharalaya, now known as Rolous.

Prasat Bakong was built in the late 9th century and was considered Angkor's state temple for a few years.

Prasat Bakong was built in the late 9th century and was considered Angkor’s state temple for a few years.

View from the steps of Prasat Bakong. You will notice a modern Buddhist temple on the right side of the east entrance.

View from the first level of Prasat Bakong. You will notice a modern Buddhist temple on the right side of the east entrance.

So this is the other side of Prasat Bakong and our tour guide declared himself as our official photographer, hence my camera was with him the whole time. So I'm free to photobomb my friends. :D

So this is the other side of Prasat Bakong and our tour guide declared himself as our official photographer, hence my camera was with him the whole time. And that means, I will finally be included in the photos. 😀

We have finally reached the end of our three days of temple-hopping. And so, off we trekked back to our van and passed by this part of the moat surrounding Prasat Bakong.

We have finally reached the end of our three days of temple-hopping. And so, off we trekked back to our van and passed by this part of the moat surrounding Prasat Bakong.

Souvenir shot with our humorous tour guide, Reah (the one in lilac shirt) and nice driver,Toy (yup, that's his name).

Souvenir shot with our humorous tour guide, Reah (the one in lilac shirt) and nice driver,Toy (yup, that’s his name).

We finished our tour early and as they dropped us off at our hotel, we bade Reah and Toy farewell. And of course, we can't let them go without a souvenir shot. :D

We finished our tour early and as they dropped us off at our hotel, we bade Reah and Toy farewell. And of course, we can’t let them go without a souvenir shot. 😀

So, will we recommend Sam Tuktuk Tours to our friends? YES! I likewise placed my review of his tour here. It’s just crazy that Reah had a pink eye that day and he still decided to go to work. And because I know it’s contagious, I always had my hand sanitizer ready whenever I came in contact with him the whole time. But in my excitement to check the photos in our room, I completely forgot to wipe my camera. So two days later, I got more than a souvenir from our tour guide: a Khmer pink eye. 😉

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